Articles from 2018

103 articles found.

June bearing strawberries are “short day” plants that initiate flower buds in response to short days (less than 14 hours day length). Day length for Indianapolis drops below 14 hours about August 10.  As we get into late summer, strawberry plants respond to shorter days by setting the flower buds that will result in the crop next spring. It is important to maintain appropriate nutrition and soil water status during this time. General recommendations are to fertilize strawberry fields with 20 to 50 pounds of actual nitrogen per acre per during late summer.  Nitrogen rates depend upon amount supplied at renovation and plant vigor. New fields with high vigor may not need additional nitrogen now, but older fields should benefit. Irrigation during this time is also extremely important if rainfall has not been sufficient in your area. We suggest about 1 inch per week. Continue to irrigate strawberries through fall[Read More…]


Strawberries are primarily grown in the matted row system in Indiana, in which bare-root strawberry plants are set in the spring, fruit is first harvested in the second year and plantings are renovated each year for a few seasons. Growers in Southern Indiana have expressed interest in growing strawberries in the annual plasticultural system. With this annual system, plants are set in the fall and harvested in the spring of the following year. Plantings are not normally carried over a second year. Although the annual plasticultural system is very popular in the southern states, its usage is limited in Indiana mainly because our short fall weather conditions pose a challenge for strawberry plants to develop enough branch crowns, which allows them to achieve the optimal yield in the following spring. In the past two years, we have been testing the annual strawberry production system with additional protection from high tunnels[Read More…]



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Stone Fruit: At our orchard, we lost our stone fruit with the -20 degree F temperatures this winter. For those of you fortunate enough to have fruit, frequent and heavy rain present problems multiple problems, namely bacterial spot and brown rot. Three weeks before harvest, cease bacterial spot sprays, even though bacterial spot may continue to be an issue with this hot wet weather. You can still manage brown rot. To maintain and protect fruit, be sure to rotate chemistries by FRAC Code to minimize the risk of fungicide resistance. Some options to consider (choose one from each column and then choose a different column-do not repeat a column back to back, and always used the highest labeled rate).


PristineTM apple

Although PristineTM was selected in 1982, its history goes back to the early days of the PRI breeding program. From an original cross of Rome Beauty with Malus floribunda 821, selections and hybridizations were made incorporating Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Starking Delicious  and Cazumat along the way. The cross that resulted in PristineTM was Coop 10 x Cazumat made in 1974 at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and PristineTM was selected at the Purdue Hort. Farm in 1982. PristineTM is a very early maturing apple usually ripening in late July in Lafayette. In most seasons it will be a couple of weeks ahead of Gala. It is very attractive with a clean finish. For such an early apple, it has very good eating quality, certainly much better than other very early apples such as Lodi or Transparent. The texture is crisp and flavor has a good acid/sugar balance. If fruit are[Read More…]


ReTain (AVG) is a plant growth regulator that blocks the production of ethylene. When ReTain is applied to apple, several ripening processes are slowed, including preharvest drop, fruit flesh softening, starch disappearance, and red color formation. In order for ReTain to be effective it must be applied well in advance of the climacteric rise in ethylene production that signals the onset of fruit maturity. If applied too early the effects may wear off prematurely. If applied too late, a significant portion of the crop may not be responsive to AVG, having already begun to produce autocatalytic ethylene. A second reason for avoiding late applications of ReTain is the 21 day preharvest interval (PHI), which, combined with a late spray date could result in an undesirable delay in harvest. The label recommends applying ReTain four weeks before anticipated harvest (WBH). This has sometimes caused confusion, as the grower is timing the[Read More…]


August 4, 2018 Hop Harvesting Workshop Crazy horse Hops, LLC, 8875 S Co. Rd. 925W, Knightstown, IN 46148 Contact afthompson@purdue.edu. Register here: http://bit.ly/hopharvest812018 or call 812-349-2575 August 30, 2018 Small Farm Education Field Day  Purdue Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 Register here: http://www.cvent.com/d/hgqx6g September 5, 2018 Greenhouse & Indoor Hydroponics Workshop Purdue University, PFEN 1159 & Purdue Horticulture Greenhouse Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu Register here: https://tinyurl.com/yaxd4k2z October 17, 2018 Indiana Flower Growers Conference Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu January 8, 2019 Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium Teibel’s Family Restaurant, Schererville, IN Contact Liz Maynard emaynard@purdue.edu https://ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/Pages/IVGS.aspx February 12-14, 2019 Indiana Hort Congress Indianapolis Marriott East Indianapolis, IN Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 http://www.inhortcongress.org