138 articles tagged "Grapes".

May 22, 2019 I INDY International Wine Competition Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Contact Katie Barnett, barnett6@purdue.edu http://www.indyinternational.org/ Nearly 2,000 entries from around the globe will be evaluated by our distinguished judges at the 2019 INDY International Wine Competition. Wine writers and winemakers, winegrowers and enologists, chefs and sommeliers, wine distributors, retailers and consumers meet every year in the heart of America, a truly central place for your wines to be seen and recognized. June 1, 2019 Vintage Indiana Military Park, Indianapolis, IN Contact Katie Barnett, barnett6@purdue.edu http://www.indyinternational.org/ 20th Celebration of Indiana Wines. 11:00am VIP entrance, 12(noon)-6pm regular admission entrance.Vintage Indiana Wine Fest is the BIGGEST annual celebration of delicious wines produced only in Indiana! We’re dedicated to celebrating not just the wine, but the spirit of Indiana winemakers; the only winemakers in the world capable of blending Hoosier hospitality into every bottle. This year’s festival features nearly 30 Indiana[Read More…]


Grapes are in the early stages of growth across the state, from bud break to pre-bloom. This is the most important time to maintain “preventative” control of the major grape diseases such as Phomopsis, black rot, powdery and downy mildew. Our general recommendation is to maintain good coverage with mancozeb through the early stages of growth. When vines reach the pre-bloom stage, addition of one of the demethylation inhibiting (DMI) fungicides in the FRAC 3 group greatly improves black rot control and provides powdery mildew control. Rally, Tebustar, Procure, and Mettle are common FRAC 3 fungicides. This group is systemic, thus very rainfast. There are a number of other options available, but this simple approach has been very effective in our trials.


honeyberry

The season is underway in the Lafayette area thanks to the warmer than normal conditions of the past week. Apples are at pink to early bloom, early grapes are at bud break and late ones are at full swell, currant, gooseberry and honey berry are in bloom, strawberry flower buds are visible in the crowns, and raspberry and blackberry both have well developed shoots. Paw paws are in pre-bloom.


May 6, 2019 Purdue Wine Grape Team Spring Workshop Blackhawk Winery Sheridan, IN Contact: Katie Barnett, barnett6@purdue.edu  May 22, 2019 I INDY International Wine Competition Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN http://www.indyinternational.org/ June 1, 2019 Vintage Indiana Military Park, Indianapolis, IN https://www.vintageindiana.com/ June 21, 2019 Purdue Master Gardener State Tour New Albany, IN https://www.sunnysidemg.org/ June 27, 2019 Southwest Purdue Ag Center Field Day Southwest Purdue Ag Center Contact Dennis Nowaskie nowaskie@purdue.edu July 9, 2019 Turf & Landscape Field Day Daniel Turf Center, West Lafayette, IN https://turf.purdue.edu/field-day.html July 18, 2019 Meigs Field Day Purdue Meigs Farm Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu July 22-23, 2019 Indiana Winery and Vineyard Association Summer Meeting. Country Heritage Winery, LaOtto, IN https://www.indianawinevine.org/ August 1, 2019 Small Farm Ed Field Day Daniel Turf Center, Purdue Student Farm Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu September 5, 2019 Hydroponics & Greenhouse workshop Purdue University, Deans auditorium Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu September 10-12, 2020[Read More…]


Early spring is a good time to make the first herbicide application of the year in fruit plantings where a weed-free strip is maintained in the row. There are several options for fruit crops including both pre- and post-emergent herbicides. See the weed control chapter in the 2019-2020 Midwest Fruit Pest Management Guide for a complete list of registered products. In most situations, there will be some emerged weeds present in the planting at this time of the year. These could be winter annuals, perennials, or recently germinated summer annuals. A post-emergent herbicide can be used to control those established weeds. A pre-emergent material can be tank mixed at this time to provide residual weed control. However, most pre-emergent herbicides will provide only 6 to 8 weeks of control as they break down in the environment. So, if applied in very early spring, they may not provide sufficient control of[Read More…]


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FieldWatch is an easy-to-use, reliable, accurate and secure on-line mapping tool intended to enhance communications that promotes awareness and stewardship activities between producers of specialty crops, beekeepers, and pesticide applicators. Originally developed at Purdue University, FieldWatch is now a non-profit company with support from producers, applicators, agricultural chemical companies and other organizations. The program allows specialty crop producers and beekeepers to enter their locations on a secure on-line map. The map is viewed by pesticide applicators so they know what crops are in the area they intend to treat. For the past couple of years, applicators planning to apply the new dicamba products (XtendiMax, FeXapan, Engenia) have been required to check Fieldwatch. All you need to do to sign up is visit http://www.fieldwatch.com/ and follow the easy tutorials under the resources tab. Once you have an account, you should be asked to update your FieldWatch information each year. If you[Read More…]


May 6, 2019 Purdue Wine Grape Team Spring Workshop Blackhawk Winery Sheridan, IN Contact: Katie Barnett, barnett6@purdue.edu  May 22, 2019 I INDY International Wine Competition Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN http://www.indyinternational.org/ June 1, 2019 Vintage Indiana Military Park, Indianapolis, IN https://www.vintageindiana.com/ June 21, 2019 Purdue Master Gardener State Tour New Albany, IN https://www.sunnysidemg.org/ July 9, 2019 Turf & Landscape Field Day Daniel Turf Center, West Lafayette, IN https://turf.purdue.edu/field-day.html July 18, 2019 Meigs Field Day Purdue Meigs Farm Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu July 22-23, 2019 Indiana Winery and Vineyard Association Summer Meeting. Country Heritage Winery, LaOtto, IN https://www.indianawinevine.org/ August 1, 2019 Small Farm Ed Field Day Daniel Turf Center, Purdue Student Farm Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu September 5, 2019 Hydroponics & Greenhouse workshop Purdue University, Deans auditorium Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu September 10-12, 2020 Purdue Master Gardener State Conference Hosted by Hamilton and Howard Counties Hamilton County Fairgrounds, Noblesville, IN https://hcmga.org/2020-state-conference/[Read More…]


This past week has been warm enough that we’re seeing activity in the Lafayette area. Southern areas are further along. See the note from Englebrecht’s Orchard in the Evansville area. We appreciate their help with crop condition reports and welcome others to submit their observations as well. In the Lafayette area brambles are pushing rapidly. Some are past 3/4 inch green and leaves are starting to show. Early grapes are just starting bud swell. Apples are mostly at half inch green. Paw paw flowers are swollen but have not started to open yet. Strawberry leaves continue to grow but flower buds are not yet visible in the crowns. There is still a risk of frost across the central and northern part of the state. Best wishes for a frost-free spring.  


grape

Growers across the state are finishing up pruning. Most apple and blueberry growers are done, and bramble and grape growers are finishing up.  Even though this is a late spring compared to some recent years, there are still chances of spring frost damage. Grape growers can use long or double pruning to help delay bud break and avoid frost damage. Peach growers also delay pruning as much as possible to help delay bloom. But for other fruit crops, little can be done to passively avoid frost. Hopefully we will have a good year and no spring frost damage will occur. Grape growers with a high incidence of trunk disease may want to consider applications of Topsin M after pruning is complete, or anytime that pruning is done in wet weather. The jury is still out of the efficacy of these applications, but they can’t hurt. We are seeing increased incidences[Read More…]


The University of Minnesota Department of Horticultural Science takes a fresh, encouraging new look at growing fruit in the home garden. This guide will help gardeners decide which fruits are right for their gardens and their lifestyles, taking readers through every step from planning, choosing cultivars, and planting, to harvesting and pruning. Readers will find information on the major pests to look out for, and simple tips on how to deal with them; or better yet, prevent them. Growing Fruit in the Northern Garden