162 articles tagged "Apples".

September 24, 2018 Purdue Fall Winegrape Workshop From Vineyard to Winery Registration required, contact Jill Blume blume@purdue.edu September 28, 2018 Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Southwest Purdue Ag Center, Vincennes, IN Contact Scott Monroe, 812-886-0198 October 17, 2018 Indiana Flower Growers Conference Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu January 8, 2019 Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium Teibel’s Family Restaurant, Schererville, IN Contact Liz Maynard emaynard@purdue.edu https://ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/Pages/IVGS.aspx February 12-14, 2019 Indiana Hort Congress Indianapolis Marriott East Indianapolis, IN Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 http://www.inhortcongress.org


Apple Honeycrisp bitter rot sporulating

As harvest continues, so does the summer rot saga, especially bitter rot. Multiple orchards are reporting significant to complete loss of Honeycrisp throughout the Midwest, in addition to other varieties. Honeycrisp is by far the worst hit, but its seems that Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, Cameo, Ida Red, Empire, Fuji and Gala have had problems in the past. If you are having problems on other varieties, please let me know. We have a trial underway to see if a preharvest application of captan or Merivon helps improves long-term storage options. I’ll have the data to you for the winter horticultural congress in Indianapolis.


blackberry

Grape harvest is underway for early and mid-season varieties. Downy and powdery mildew are showing up in vineyards. Table grapes have been especially nice this year. Primocane bramble harvest is also underway. Surprising low number of spotted wing Drosophila have been found in grapes or brambles. Frequent rains are very unwelcome as they generally have a negative effect on fruit quality in both grapes and brambles. Gala and Honey Crisp apples are being harvested. Weeds and row middle covers are growing excessively with all the recent rains.


Susan Brown of Cornell probably said it best: “The performance and attributes of Honeycrisp are varied and can be grouped under the heading, ‘The good, the bad, and the ugly.’ The ‘good’ refers to a great name for marketing and excellent texture, crispness, and juiciness. The ‘bad’ refers to coloring problems, appearance defects, and susceptibility to an undiagnosed leaf dis- order. The ‘ugly’ refers to bitter pit, scald, soft scald, and a tendency to ferment due to skin permeability problems.” More than 25 years after the release of Honeycrisp, we still don’t have definitive answers. We are already experiencing numerous reports of Honeycrisp (and other apple) yellows this year (Fig. 1a,b,c). This disorder is a genetic peculiarity of Honeycrisp (and apparently a few other varieties) and is believed to be caused by excessive buildup of carbohydrates in the leaves (Snyder-Leiby and Wang, 2008). Yellowing is often most severe on trees[Read More…]


September 5, 2018 Greenhouse & Indoor Hydroponics Workshop Purdue University, PFEN 1159 & Purdue Horticulture Greenhouse Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu Register here: https://tinyurl.com/yaxd4k2z September 24, 2018 Purdue Fall Winegrape Workshop From Vineyard to Winery. Registration info and itinerary coming soon! Save the date! Contact Jill Blume blume@purdue.edu October 17, 2018 Indiana Flower Growers Conference Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu January 8, 2019 Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium Teibel’s Family Restaurant, Schererville, IN Contact Liz Maynard emaynard@purdue.edu https://ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/Pages/IVGS.aspx February 12-14, 2019 Indiana Hort Congress Indianapolis Marriott East Indianapolis, IN Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 http://www.inhortcongress.org  


August 30, 2018 Small Farm Education Field Day  Purdue Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 Register here: http://www.cvent.com/d/hgqx6g September 5, 2018 Greenhouse & Indoor Hydroponics Workshop Purdue University, PFEN 1159 & Purdue Horticulture Greenhouse Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu Register here: https://tinyurl.com/yaxd4k2z September 24, 2018 Purdue Fall Winegrape Workshop From Vineyard to Winery. Registration info and itinerary coming soon! Save the date! Contact Jill Blume blume@purdue.edu October 17, 2018 Indiana Flower Growers Conference Daniel Turf Center Contact Lori Jolly-Brown ljollybr@purdue.edu January 8, 2019 Illiana Vegetable Growers Symposium Teibel’s Family Restaurant, Schererville, IN Contact Liz Maynard emaynard@purdue.edu https://ag.purdue.edu/hla/Extension/Pages/IVGS.aspx February 12-14, 2019 Indiana Hort Congress Indianapolis Marriott East Indianapolis, IN Contact Lori Jolly-Brown, ljollybr@purdue.edu or 765-494-1296 http://www.inhortcongress.org


Fig. 1. Bitter pit and lenticel rot often appear at the calyx end of the fruit. Photo by Janna Beckerman

With weird weather often comes weird physiological disorders (on top of our summer fruit rots). Often confused with hail injury, disease or insect damage, these physiological disorders are marring the appearance of many apples. Symptoms of bitter pit include circular or even irregular sunken spots on the fruit surface, beneath brownish or streaked dead regions (Fig. 1). Note that the damage can be separated from the skin surface. Symptoms may be mistaken for hail damage, or any of the below problems. A key diagnostic feature is that hail usually affects only one side of the fruit, whereas bitter pit is more severe on blossom end of the fruit. Some varieties, like Honeycrisp, are more prone to this disorder, whereas hail will impact (literally) all varieties of fruit. Bitter pit can show up throughout the orchard, not just the edges. Cork spot is another physiological disorder affecting outer portion of the[Read More…]


With harvest around the corner for many fruit crops, I thought this would be a good time to remind readers about our email lists. Various forms of social media is used by just about everyone in today’s society.  While Facebook and Twitter are much more commonly used than email, there is still a place for email lists. Mail lists continue to be a successful communication tool for groups of people. The way a mail list works is that people subscribe and then have the authority to post messages to the list. All other subscribers on the list receive the messages. One message can be sent to hundreds of readers at once. Replies to messages on a mail list can either go only to the sender of the message or to the entire list. Purdue HLA Extension maintains two mail lists for users. The “Fruitveg” list is for all fruit and vegetable growers, farm[Read More…]


PristineTM apple

Although PristineTM was selected in 1982, its history goes back to the early days of the PRI breeding program. From an original cross of Rome Beauty with Malus floribunda 821, selections and hybridizations were made incorporating Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Starking Delicious  and Cazumat along the way. The cross that resulted in PristineTM was Coop 10 x Cazumat made in 1974 at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and PristineTM was selected at the Purdue Hort. Farm in 1982. PristineTM is a very early maturing apple usually ripening in late July in Lafayette. In most seasons it will be a couple of weeks ahead of Gala. It is very attractive with a clean finish. For such an early apple, it has very good eating quality, certainly much better than other very early apples such as Lodi or Transparent. The texture is crisp and flavor has a good acid/sugar balance. If fruit are[Read More…]


ReTain (AVG) is a plant growth regulator that blocks the production of ethylene. When ReTain is applied to apple, several ripening processes are slowed, including preharvest drop, fruit flesh softening, starch disappearance, and red color formation. In order for ReTain to be effective it must be applied well in advance of the climacteric rise in ethylene production that signals the onset of fruit maturity. If applied too early the effects may wear off prematurely. If applied too late, a significant portion of the crop may not be responsive to AVG, having already begun to produce autocatalytic ethylene. A second reason for avoiding late applications of ReTain is the 21 day preharvest interval (PHI), which, combined with a late spray date could result in an undesirable delay in harvest. The label recommends applying ReTain four weeks before anticipated harvest (WBH). This has sometimes caused confusion, as the grower is timing the[Read More…]